Rose colored glasses

I just started reading Francis Chan‘s Forgotten God. As a nice prequel he has great warning about the difference between two words: exegesis and eisegesis. Exegesis is extracting from the text the meaning. Eisegesis when we bring into the text what we think it means. The first can be scary because we must adjust to what God says. It can be difficult because we must come to the text open to what it tells us. The second will be comfortable at first, but will lead down a wrong road.

One of the first lessons when I started seminary the Prof pushed us all on the preconceived ideas that people have brought to the Bible. The emphasis was to first understand the culture that the text was written and what it meant to them. Then find the overarching lesson or truth that then can be interpreted in our context. It all starts with coming to the text without our rose colored glasses.

But think, Jesus had to fight the same issue. Much of Jesus’ ministry he was working against what they thought the “Christ” would be like. For the Jews they had so many preconceived about what God anointed would be like. He was going to be a conquering King according to their expectations. Jesus knew they had to approach him with an open mind. He was going to be different. The Pharisees also fought with Jesus over so many expectations. They argued over the Sabbath, over ceremonial washing, over where he was born. They were not ready break free from their ideas of the Christ. And because of it they missed the very best for them.

May we not miss the very best God has for us by holding on to our “ideas” and not being willing to come to Christ with none of our baggage. Take off your glasses.

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Comments
5 Responses to “Rose colored glasses”
  1. Tim Rich says:

    And now, Paul is writing to Christian Jews that are bound in what they think God wants from them, but they’re missing the freedom and liberty Christ brought through his death and resurrection.
    Jews and Gentiles are now being judged not only for our actions, but also the inner man, our sin nature. As Paul said in Romans 2:29; a true Isrealite in one that is a Jew inwardly…one that is circumcised in the heart and spirit. We are now justified freely by His grace…justified by faith without the deeds of the law.

  2. Tom holler says:

    sometimes it is difficult to discern what was meant specifically for the disciples and how the bible applies to us today?? spiritual gifts such as healing, tongues ect. Did u read Crazy Love by Francis Chan…very convicting …that we could ALL do more for the Kingdom!

    • Dane says:

      I did read Francis’ Crazy Love. I really liked the first few chapters…very motivational.

      I’ve always thought that healings and tongues were signs that God gave us so that we would make note of the importance of Jesus’ coming and the building of his church. As you look at Acts it seems as though the healings and tongues fade into the background. There wasn’t the need for something spectacular to happen. Yet I hear from missionaries that the Lord is speaking to people in their dreams or a healing occurring. Perhaps as God is opening new areas he uses the signs as a way to point people to Jesus…even today.

      What did you like about Crazy Love Tom?

  3. Tim Rich says:

    Jesus put emphasis on the disciples (and about 120) staying put in Jerusalem and WAIT for the promise of the Comforter. They waited 10 days after Jesus left for Acts 2:4….
    Peter’s sermon after the outpouring of the Holy Spirit mentioned this is a fulfillment of prophecy; The prophet Joel’s prophecy in Joel 2:28. Peter goes on to say in Acts 2:33 that the promise of the Father would be seen and heard.
    The 3,000 souls that were converted on The Day of Pentecost were marked. They heard the Holy Spirit speak in their own language. Many of them baptized in the Holy Spirit that day were from out of town celebrating the Jewish Day of Pentecost. How ironic that now the gentiles also have a Day of Pentecost to celebrate. The people from Rome heard the Holy Spirit speak in their own language…they received Peter’s words and were saved and then baptized in the Holy Spirit…Peter separates the 2 experiences in Acts 2:38, so does Acts 4:31. The Romans were excited to have Paul visit them even as a prisoner, but Peter’s sermon on the Day of Pentecost was instrumental for the Romans being “ready to receive Paul.
    Acts 8:12-17 gives a distinction between baptisms. The people in Samaria believed Philip’s preaching and were baptized with water. Then Peter came to Samaria and prayed with them so they could receive the Baptism of the Holy Spirit.
    Peter’s sermon to the gentiles in Acts 10 emphasizes another separation between baptisms…Acts 10:44-46…and then Jesus’ words in Acts 11:16.
    Apollos at Ephesus was born again “had only the baptism of John”…another distinction made between the 2 baptisms (Acts 18:25). Paul in Ephesus asked them, “have you received the Holy Spirit since you believed’? (Acts 19:2-6).
    The importance of the spread of the gospel in the early church can’t be more important than the spread of the gospel in these last days. Jesus put great emphasis on his believers receiving the baptism of the Holy Spirit in the early church…I’m just wondering if it’s something we need to look into.
    I Corinthians 14:2 separates the speaking of tongues in private and then in the church. The speaking of tongues in private edifies and comforts…another good example from scripture that we can ponder and look into.
    Paul said in 1 Corinthians 14:18 that he spoke in tongues more than anyone…I guessing the Holy Spirit edified him in private many times because of the importance of his mission. Paul says later in that chapter (14:39)…allow the speaking of tongues.
    Anyway, thanks for listening…I’ve studied this subject matter many times over, and it’s a very interesting search through the scriptures if we have an open heart and mind about God’s signs and miracles for today.

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